How Long Term Care Facilities Can Keep Their Employees Long-Term

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Written by Carlos Lozano

July 20, 2018

How Long Term Care Facilities Can Keep Their Employees Long-Term

Have you ever wondered what the typical turnover rate is for a long term care, or LTC, employee? A study conducted by the American Health Care Association, or AHCA, showed that there is an approximate 40% turnover rate when it comes to LTC employees.

Your employees are essential to your organization’s success, but they may not always be treated that way. The retention issue within the LTC industry isn’t just a lack of commitment from the employees; it may also be affected by the negative perspective many have of the LTC workplace. Organizations in LTC need to start using strategies from other organizations to keep your employees on.

Most industries have some aspects that may be viewed negatively by prospective employees. Unfortunately, these negative perceptions, whether correct or incorrect, can have a significant impact on recruiting and retention. McKnight’s Long Term Care News stated that due to a lack of training and respect for LTC employees in order to save money, the LTC industry may be creating a negative perception of employment and causing the retention rate to drop to record lows. Along with these money saving tactics, there have also been numerous other poor practices, such as high workloads, lack of appreciation, and lack of experience that may discourage individuals to work in the LTC industry. Without action, these practices can continue to have a negative affect on retention levels in the industry. The retention issue is amplified by the fact that the baby boomer generation will soon retire. This begs the question, who will be ready, and have the experience, to take over when they leave?

Although it may seem difficult to become employed within the LTC industry, it can be a rewarding career if employers can emphasize their appreciation to their employees. Provider Magazine stresses that the three primary themes to drive commitment and retention are:

Leadership behavior
In order to help decrease the turnover rate in this industry, initiative must be taken at the top. Although the turnover rate is higher amongst the service-level employees, there is also a high number of administrators and managers that rotate in and out of organizations as well. It’s important to lead by example, but if management cannot stay in their positions for an extended period of time, their employees aren’t likely to either.

A sense of connectedness
As an employer, if you can ensure that your employees feel that they are a valuable asset to the team, you will be able to see the difference. Additionally, Monster explains how encouraging a stronger relationship between your employees and patients is a long-term benefit for both parties (pun intended?). Making your employees feel connected to the organization will make a difference.

Opportunities for growth and recognition
In any field that you may enter, one of the most common goals that anyone may have is the opportunity for growth. By having a steady goal and performance management system, you can show your employees recognition for jobs well done and promote them when the time comes.

Increasing your retention rate doesn’t need to be a massive undertaking. However, when employees don’t feel appreciated, it is unlikely that they will stay. It was predicted that in 2016 we would experience approximately 21% of employees leaving their jobs in all fields this year. Since the retention rate is higher in the LTC industry compared to others, it is important to utilize best practices that will encourage the brightest and most talented individuals within the LTC industry to stay with your organization.

This DATIS Blog was written by Carlos Lozano, DATIS, on June 1st, 2016 and may not be re-posted without permission.